HomePopular1969 Neil Armstrong steps on the Moon

1969 Neil Armstrong steps on the Moon

“That’s one small step for man. One giant leap for mankind,” said Commander Neil Armstrong as he took his first steps on the Moon. A staggering 650 million people worldwide heard Armstrong’s words through their televisions as they watched him make history on July 21-1969.

Before his iconic words were spoken, Armstrong had some trouble exiting the lunar module called Eagle. When he made it out, he took a moment to observe the desolate landscape of the lunar region known as the Sea of Tranquility. He remarked that the Moon’s dust was very fine and somewhat powdery before moving forward to make the first-ever boot print in it.

Apollo 11’s pilot Buzz Aldrin emerged from Eagle almost 20 minutes after Armstrong and became the second person to ever set foot on our Moon. The two astronauts performed a number of scientific experiments on the lunar surface. These experiments proved vital in expanding humanity’s knowledge of the Moon.

Apollo 11 was a mission of many firsts. It was the first manned mission to another planetary body, broadcasted the first extravehicular activity and collected the first geological samples from the Moon. Apollo 11 also hosted the first Earth to Moon telephone conversation between Armstrong and U.S. President Richard Nixon, who said it was “the most historic phone call ever made from the White House.”

President Nixon was concerned about the Apollo 11 mission failing. He didn’t relish the idea of having to announce an expensive failure resulting in the death of two astronauts to the American public. Nixon had valid reasons to be concerned because, before its successful landing, Apollo 11 experienced an array of different problems.

Intermittent radio connectivity between Apollo 11 and Earth and the last-minute realization that the Eagle module was burning more fuel than initially intended causing it to overshoot its planned landing site were just two of many issues.

Ultimately the astronauts’ quick thinking, skill, and determination would save the day and result in one of the most significant and awe-inspiring scientific achievements of all time.

Robert Blakehttp://app-multisite-prd-wu2.azurewebsites.net
I enjoy everything history, hiking the wilderness, and spending time with my family! I really hope you all enjoy our sites content, thanks for visiting!
RELATED ARTICLES

Death Railway Completed

The Burma-Thailand Railway might seem like an idyllic way to see beautiful scenery in countries less heavily trafficked by tourists, but many don't know...

1813 Battle of Leipzig

The Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of Nations, was one of the most significant battles in history and the largest in...

1969 Vietnam Moratorium Day; millions nationwide protest the war

By 1969, the US had been involved in the Vietnam War for over a decade and suffered over 40,000 casualties. Though many politicians insisted...

Most Popular

Death Railway Completed

The Burma-Thailand Railway might seem like an idyllic way to see beautiful scenery in countries less heavily trafficked by tourists, but many don't know...

1813 Battle of Leipzig

The Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of Nations, was one of the most significant battles in history and the largest in...

1969 Vietnam Moratorium Day; millions nationwide protest the war

By 1969, the US had been involved in the Vietnam War for over a decade and suffered over 40,000 casualties. Though many politicians insisted...

2010 Copiapó mining accident in Chile comes to a happy end as all 33 miners arrive at the surface after surviving a record 69...

On October 13, 2010, 33 miners slowly emerged from a capsule that was repeatedly lowered deep in the ground. The miners had been trapped...

Recent Comments

Linda Parker-Fedak on 1916 1st “Piggly Wiggly” opens
Susan Rutkowski on 1856 Louis Sullivan Born
Barbara Keene on 1847 Jesse James Born
Rita oates on 1960 Sean Penn, born
par nastasiak on 1620 Mayflower sets sail
Patty Valdez on 1945 V-J Day, end WWII
Dave Johnston on 1945 V-J Day, end WWII
Janice Loraine Tomlin on 1967 “Bonnie and Clyde” released
🙏MOM❤️ FATHERDaDie’ on 1967 “Bonnie and Clyde” released
Rehan Walgama on 1990 Operation Desert Shield
Tom Saldana on Machu Picchu Discovered
John Scott on Machu Picchu Discovered