RMS Lusitania Sinks

May 7, 2022

World War I was unlike any war that had ever gone before. Not only did it involve a large portion of the nations of the world, but it also involved a lot of new military technology. Much of this new technology had never been used in battle before—specifically that of submarines. Submarines completely upended the ancient art of war at sea, and at first, ships didn’t know how to deal with them. On May 7, 1915, this led to disastrous consequences for more than a thousand people aboard the RMS Lusitania, in an incident that changed the course of the war.

Initially, America took a stance of neutrality, wanting no part in the war in Europe. However, Britain was an important trading partner of the United States. Therefore, when the Germans tried to blockade the British Isles, America wasn’t inclined to listen. America still remained silent when the Germans announced unrestricted submarine warfare would be waged on any and all ships in British waters.

In May of that year, a number of New York newspapers published warnings that Americans traveling on British ships did so at their own risk.  One of these papers ran the warning right alongside an advertisement for the sailing of the RMS Lusitania from New York to Liverpool. Unfortunately, not many passengers paid heed.

On May 7, shortly after the RMS Lusitania entered British waters, it was identified by a German U-boat (their term for a submarine), which promptly launched a torpedo at it. Although the captain had been advised to take precautions against submarine attacks, he had no real idea how to do that. The Lusitania sank in 20 minutes, killing 1,198 people and leaving just 761 survivors. The RMS Lusitania was a passenger ship, and many of the dead were Americans. This led to public opinion in America turning sharply against Germany and contributed to America’s entry into the war.

5 Comments

  1. dpdenlar

    You forgot to mention the fact that there was on board small arms and ammunitions, also artillary rounds. Most people don’t know that this was an official secret to gain American sympathy. This was discovered by none other that Jacque Cousteau when his dive team dove on the wreck sometime in the 1960-1970’s, This fact alone made the Lusitania a legal target of war.

    Reply
  2. HENRY A. ROA

    The straw that broke the camel’s back was the Zimmerman Cable to Mexico, not entirely the Lusitania.

    Reply
  3. WILLIAM STEENBLOCK

    J.P. MORGAN & A LOT OF RICH PEOPLE HAD LENT ENGLAND MONEY. THERE WAS A FEAR IF GERMANY WON THEY WOULD NOT GET THEIR MONEY BACK. THE UNITED STATES HAD BEEN HUNTING AN EXCUJSE TO GET INTO THE WAR AND THE SINKING OF THE SHIP WAS ENOUGH TO DO IT.

    Reply
  4. Henry F Fabian Jr, MD, MBA

    Pretty primitive report – was this written by a high school student doing a cursory book report? No mention about the reported arms carried in the cargo of the Lusitania?

    Reply
  5. Janos Molnar

    Winston Churchill was top man in the British Navy. He wanted to save Britain on the top of the world. They were shipping weapons and ammunitions in a civilian ship, what was TOTALY ILLEGAL. The German adds in the New York newspapers stated this, warning the people, and said they will have to sink this ship.

    Near to the Irish coastline the Germans struck, after the torpedo’s explosion there was a secondary explosion, bigger than the first. The British had orders from Churchill to stand down. So many more people from the Lusitania perished, many American. This was the final push to get the US involved.

    Reply

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